lucile ball

This is a classic picture of one of my all time favorite comediennes with a well known skit. Every time life comes at us fast, this is what I am reminded of.  Sometimes no matter how hard we try, we have to swallow some of the stuff coming our way in order to keep moving forward. As I have been having more recent medical complications due to my Parkinson’s disease and medication side effects, I again was reminded of Lucille Ball. I like her initially was thinking in the last few months that perhaps I was on the other side and I could handle going back to working as a physician despite my PD (easy- peeze-no problem). However, as life demands have increased followed by  one thing, another and another, I have begun to feel like things are speeding up on my own conveyor belt causing a big pile up, making the juggling and keeping up a bit more hectic and demanding. This does not mean I am giving up on practicing neurology again or stop my advocacy.

But, I have begun to think more about those of us who live with chronic illness and have a job, trying to maintain one, or are looking for ways to earn a living with a different career after PD diagnosis.

As many of us have learned, it is not always possible to keep working at previous capacity or even at any capacity when illness strikes particularly in the face of continuous fluctuations especially if sudden or unpredictable, as mine has been lately, or as we approach advanced stages and begin experiencing motor fluctuations such as dyskenesias.

According to a British study of 308 Parkinson’s patients, 82% had ceased to work after 10 years of disease, 57% retired early like me due to disease.

We all know life with a chronic disease like Parkinson’s is a constant juggling act. We have to learn to balance our health along with family, social, and work responsibilities. This can be a feat for many.

When we first get diagnosed after the initial shock wears off and reality sets in, we have to consider our financial resources to be able to continue providing not just for those who depend on us; but more importantly for the increasing financial needs that come with being chronically ill.

So as you contemplate your future financial stability, you must start making concessions for a time when you are no longer able to carry out your present job duties or perform any standard job. Think of the worst scenario and build from there but without going to panic mode or being paralyzed by anxiety and fear.

I am sure you will begin to wonder if you should share your diagnosis with your boss or fellow employees.

First, I have to say candidly and with all due respect-it is no body’s business unless you want it to be. If your job is unaffected – may not need to disclose. But if you are having to take off more, or performance no longer the same as it was prior to symptoms of PD, this maybe an indication of the need to discuss diagnosis sooner rather than later. If you are self-employed of course you have more autonomy. You have more flexibility of decreasing hours; keeping in mind as someone who knows first-hand about running a business when boss is ill productivity and quality inevitably begins to decline unless there is someone else with vested interest to maintain. Also when you are the boss, your responsibility to those you employ supersede your take home, this means that when earnings decrease only person affected is you ( particularly at the beginning unless you curtail number of employees and/ or shut business down).

Second, take care of yourself and your health by eliminating undue stress by asking employer for things to make your life easier. Taking more breaks, coming in late once a week, having the appropriate tools to make job easier, higher chairs, work from home, etc. of course the better the worker and more indispensable you are. Subsequently, the more likely to have leverage and demands (needs) met.

Third, prepare yourself mentally about the possibility of losing your job due to PD. Few ways to be prepared for future is to continuously learn new skills (I have become a writer), update your resume, look for jobs that allow you independence, flexible hours, work from home such as telecommunications. The key is to find a new passion. We all know that when we are actively pursuing what makes us happy we infuse joy to others and work is no longer so stressful. After all you have the keys of your destiny to make the right accommodations to help with your disease.

But just because its fun it does not mean it will necessarily be easy. After all work is work and can exert a toll on our bodies. for instance, even though I very much enjoy traveling and speaking, this requires a lot more dopamine than when I am just relaxing at home.

Fourth, ask yourself truthful questions like does my irritability make it difficult for others to work with me? Could my cognitive slowness cause a serious problem at work?, do my tremors get in the way of performing daily activities at work? If you answer yes to any of these questions, you may need to talk to your employer about finding ways to avoid or diminish these symptoms so you won’t lose your job. Perhaps, it may be wise to think about career rehab or alternate jobs, as I mentioned earlier especially within your place of employment. Does your boss need meticulous work behind the scenes? PD patients have been found to be more capable of performing these types of tasks especially if repetitive.

Fifth, do not underestimate your mood- particularly for us women with PD it was discovered in similar study as above that women are more prone to leave the work force earlier due to depression, anxiety, and overall general poor quality of life. We as women also have to recall that we have more stressors such as being caregivers to elderly parents, children, grandchildren, and many times have less financial resources available to us. remember to enlist help of a team of professionals to help planning for future. these include social workers, estate planning lawyers and financial planners.

Finally, You may require to plan for both long and short-‘term costs of medication, home adaptations, insurance and other health care related needs’. This also includes planning or at least thinking weather or not you might apply for social security disability or early social security which can affect retirement plans.

For more information go to :PDF  link below to find financial and legal advice/support.

 

Sources:

http://www.pdf.org/en/science_news/release/pr_1415296989

http://www.pdf.org/fin_legal_work

http://www.pdf.org/en/fall05_employment

When to disclose illness at work

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16941456